Australian Shepherd Potty Training


How to potty train an australian shepherd puppy with the Potty Training Puppy Apartment crate. We have australian shepherd house training solutions, so housebreaking australian shepherd puppies will be fast and easy. Over 50,000 dogs have been successfully potty trained with our world-famous indoor dog potty, called the Potty Training Puppy Apartment, including australian shepherds. The free video below is a short version of our free 15-minute video which is located on our Home Page. The training techniques and tips are being demonstrated by Miniature Pinscher puppies, however, the techniques are exactly the same for an australian shepherd puppy or an australian shepherd adult dog. If you are seeking australian shepherd puppies for sale or adoption, please visit our Breeders page. At the bottom half of this page is specific breed information about the temperament and traits of an australian shepherd, also known as a blue merle, mini australian shepherd, mini aussie shepherd and miniature australian shepherd. If this breed is available in a teacup or toy size it will be mentioned below.



This is an athletic dog of medium size and bone; it is lithe, agile and slightly longer than it is tall. It is muscular and powerful enough to work all day, without sacrificing the speed and agility necessary to cope with bolting livestock. Its gait is free and easy, and it must be able to change direction or speed instantly. Its double coat is weather resistant, with the outer coat of medium texture and length, straight to wavy. The expression is keen, intelligent and eager. The Australian shepherd has a great deal of stamina and is loving, bold, alert, confident, independent, smart and responsive. If it doesn't get a chance to exercise and challenge its strongly developed mental and physical activities, it is apt to become frustrated and difficult to live with. With proper exercise and training, it is a loyal, utterly devoted and obedient companion. It is reserved with strangers and has a protective nature. It may try to herd children and small animals by nipping.

This breed needs a good workout every day, preferably combining both physical and mental challenges. Even though it is physically able to live outside in temperate climates, it is a breed for which human contact is so vital that it is emotionally unsuited for a life in the yard. Its coat needs brushing or combing one to two times weekly.

The Australian shepherd is not really an Australian breed, but it came to America by way of Australia. One popular theory of the breed's origin begins during the 1800s, when the Basque people of Europe settled in Australia, bringing with them their sheep and sheepdogs. Shortly thereafter, many of these shepherds relocated to the western United States, with their dogs and sheep. American shepherds naturally dubbed these dogs Australian shepherds because that was their immediate past residence. The rugged area of Australia and western America placed demands on the herding dogs that they had not faced in Europe, but through various crosses and rigorous selection for working ability, the Basque dog soon adapted and excelled under these harsh conditions. The breed kept a low profile until the 1950s, when it was featured in a popular trick-dog act that performed in rodeos and was featured in film. Many of these dogs, owned by Jay Sisler, can be found in the pedigrees of today's Aussies. The first Aussie was registered with the International English Shepherd Registry, now known as the National Stock Dog Registry. In 1957 the Australian Shepherd Club of America was formed and subsequently became the largest Aussie registry in America. Because many ASCA members felt that AKC recognition was not desirable for their breed, proponents of AKC recognition formed the United States Australian Shepherd Association. The AKC recognized the Australian shepherd in 1993. Its popularity according to AKC statistics underestimates the popularity of this breed as a pet because a large proportion of this working breed remains unregistered with the AKC. It is among the most versatile of breeds, excelling at conformation, obedience, herding and agility competition. The Aussie is also adept at working cattle; in fact, some believe its close working style is more suited to cattle than to sheep.