Coton de Tulear Potty Training


How to potty train a Coton de Tulear puppy with the Potty Training Puppy Apartment crate. We have Coton de Tulear house training solutions, so housebreaking Coton de Tulear puppies will be fast and easy. Over 50,000 dogs have been successfully potty trained with our world-famous indoor dog potty, called the Potty Training Puppy Apartment, including Coton de Tulears. The free video below is a short version of our 15-minute video which is located on our Home Page. The training techniques and tips are being demonstrated by Miniature Pinscher puppies, however, the techniques are exactly the same for a Coton de Tulear puppy or a Coton de Tulear adult dog. If you are seeking Coton de Tulear puppies for sale or adoption, please visit our Breeders page. At the bottom half of this page is specific breed information about the temperament and traits of a Coton de Tulear. If this breed is available in a teacup, toy or miniature size it will be mentioned below.



The happy and boisterous Coton is a people-pleaser, who wants nothing more than to spend time with his humans. He forms strong bonds with family members and doesn't like to be separated from them. He's smart and easy to train, responding well to praise, play, and food rewards. He'll play the clown for attention, which he loves. Cotons may bark once or twice if the doorbell rings or they see something interesting, but they don't generally bark just for the fun of it. Guests and intruders alike run the risk of being licked to death. Females are more independent than males and often rule over them. Like every dog, Cotons need early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences. Socialization helps ensure your Coton puppy grows up to be a well-adjusted, happy dog.

The large island of Madagascar, located off the southeast coast of Africa in the Indian Ocean, is home to many unusual creatures, but one of them has become a beloved export throughout the world: the soft and shaggy Coton de Tulear, a member of the Bichon family who probably came to Madagascar as long as several hundred years ago. It's said that the little white dogs either accompanied ladies on long sea voyages or were used as ratters on ships. It's also claimed that the dogs were beached on Madagascar after being the sole survivors of a shipwreck. However they arrived, they soon established themselves there. Some of the dogs became pets in the royal court and wealthy Madagascar households, while others were street urchins. It wasn't until sometime in the 1970s, however, that a Frenchman visiting the island brought some Cotons back to France and worked to establish them as a breed. Cotons were brought to North America during the same decade. The Coton de Tulear is still found in his native land, but his sweet personality has made him a favorite throughout the world, including in the United States. He's not yet recognized by the American Kennel Club, but he is registered with the AKC's Foundation Stock Service (FSS), as well as the United Kennel Club and Europe's Federation Cynologique Internationale (FCI).