Havanese Potty Training


How to potty train a havanese puppy with the Potty Training Puppy Apartment crate. We have havanese house training solutions, so housebreaking havanese puppies will be fast and easy. Over 50,000 dogs have been successfully potty trained with our world-famous indoor dog potty, called the Potty Training Puppy Apartment, including havaneses. The free video below is a short version of our free 15-minute video which is located on our Home Page. The training techniques and tips are being demonstrated by Miniature Pinscher puppies, however, the techniques are exactly the same for a havanese puppy or a havanese adult dog. If you are seeking havanese puppies for sale or adoption, please visit our Breeders page. At the bottom half of this page is specific breed information about the temperament and traits of a havanese. If this breed is available in a teacup, toy or miniature size it will be mentioned below.



The Havanese is a small, sturdy, short-legged dog. Its unique gait is exceptionally lively and springy, accentuating the dog's happy nature. The coat is double, with both under and outer coat soft. The profuse outer coat is very long, reaching 6 to 8 inches in length, and ranges from straight to curly, with wavy preferred. The curly coat is allowed to cord. The expression is gentle. This is a busy, curious dog; it is happiest when it is the center of attention. It loves to play and clown and is affectionate with its family, children, strangers, other dogs and pets — basically everyone! The Havanese is willing to please and learn easily, but it tends to be vocal.

Although energetic, the Havanese can have its exercise needs met with a short walk or a good play session. It is not a dog that can live outside. Coat care entails brushing two to four times a week. This is a nonshedding dog, which means that loose hairs are caught in the outer hairs, tending to tangle, unless they are combed out.

The Havanese is one of the barbichon (later shortened to bichon) family of small dogs originating in the Mediterranean in ancient times. Spanish traders brought some of these dogs with them as gifts for Cuban women, allowing them to establish trading relationships. In Cuba, the little dogs were pampered as the special pets of the wealthy. They became known as Habeneros, and eventually some found their way back to Europe, where the breed was called the "white Cuban." They became quite popular, not only as pets of the elite but also as performing dogs. Their popularity as pets waned, however, and their stronghold remained in the circus, where they performed throughout Europe as trick dogs. Eventually the breed declined in numbers to such an extent that it was almost extinct not only in Europe but also in its native Cuba. A few remained in Cuba, however, and three families with their Havanese left Cuba for the United States during the 1950s and 1960s. Most present-day Havanese descend from these dogs. The breed has gradually aroused attention from dog fanciers and pet owners, and in 1996 the first Havanese entered an AKC show ring and was accepted for regular recognition as a member of the toy group as of the first day of 1999. The Havanese is also known as the Havana silk dog.